Exposing the evil of the KKK and their crime against blacks and the Catholic Church ( a touching revelation of our past, present and future)ß



The Ku Klux Klan ( /ˈkuː ˈklʌks ˈklæn, ˈkjuː/ ), Started in 1865 as a secret society (taking its name by combing kyklos, the Greek word for circle, with clan) that attacked Unionists and blacks, it was already facing extinction by the 1870s.

commonly called the KKK or the Klan , is an American white supremacist hate group , whose primary target are African Americans .  The Klan has existed in three distinct eras at different points in time during the history of the United States. 


Each has advocated extremist reactionary positions such as white nationalism , anti-immigration and—especially in later iterations— Nordicism  and anti-Catholicism . Historically, the First Klan used terrorism – both physical assault and murder – against politically active blacks and their allies in the South in the late 1860s, until it was suppressed around 1872. All three movements have called for the "purification" of American society and all are considered right-wing extremist organizations.


 In each era, membership was secret and estimates of the total were highly exaggerated by both friends and enemies.
  
The influence  of the kkk was so massive even back home in Africa cult groups were formed with such name but having zero affiliation  with the root. But just stared by the violence.
       Notable murders of high personals of the black communities, freedom fighters, and prominent Catholic priests and members were all murderd by the kkk. 


   So get ready to know what was meant to remain a secrete, and that which seeks to enslave every one even in the land of the free.
         BRACE YOURSELF AS YOU DISCOVER THE TOP 12 EVIL OF THE KKK TO MANKIND

1. Tulsa Race Riots – Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1921
Between 21 and 200 Black people were murdered after residents began rioting when a Black man was accused of raping a White woman. Tulsa KKK founder W. Tate Brady participated in the riot.

2. Murder Of Emmett Till – Money, Mississippi 1955
Till in a photograph taken by his mother on Christmas Day 1954
Till's mutilated corpse on display. His mother had insisted on an open-casket funeral. 

Emmett Till was a 14-year-old Black boy who was badly beaten to the point that his face was disfigured and one of his eyes was dislodged from its’ socket before being fatally shot, tied to a fan and thrown in the Tallahatchie River by two White men for allegedly flirting with a White woman while visiting a local store https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmett_Till.

3. Murder of Judge Edward Aaron – Birmingham, Alabama 1957
Edward Aaron was a Black handyman who was abducted by the KKK, badly beaten, castrated with a razor and left to die in a nearby creek.

4. Murder Of Willie Edwards – Alabama River, Alabama, 1957
Willie Edwards was abducted by Klansman and severely beaten in his car before being forced at gunpoint to jump 125 feet to his death off a bridge over the Alabama River.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Willie_Edwards

5. 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing That Killed Four Black School Girls – Birmingham, Alabama 1963
The four girls killed in the bombing (clockwise from top left): Addie Mae Collins (14), Cynthia Wesley (14), Carole Robertson (14), and Carol Denise McNair (11)


The KKK claimed responsibility for strategically placing bombs underneath the Black church just as Sunday school was coming to a close. The bombs later exploded and killed four Black schoolgirls between the ages of 11 and 14.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_Street_Baptist_Church_bombing


6. Murder Of Medgar Evers – Jackson, Mississippi, 1963
Medgar Evers was a civil rights activist, husband and father who was assassinated by KKK member, Byron De La Beckwith, in his driveway while returning home from a meeting with NAACP lawyers.

7. Murder Of Viola Liuzzo – Selma, Alabama 1965
Viola Liuzzo was a White civil rights activist, mother and wife. She was shot twice in the head by four KKK members who became enraged after seeing her riding in the car with a Black man, who was also an activist.

8. Michael Donald Murder – Mobile, Alabama, 1981
Michael Donald was killed by KKK members after being questionably charged with the murder of a White policeman. The Klan members beat him with a tree limb, strangled him with a rope and slit his throat, before later hanging him from a tree in a local neighborhood yard.

9. Mount Zion AME Church Burning – Greelyville, South Carolina 1995
Mount Zion AME Church was burned to the ground by KKK members before later being rebuilt.

10. Murder of Jason Smith – Eros, Louisiana, 2011
Jason Smith was a 14-year-old Black student from Louisiana who was found dead in a local lake with his organs missing. Although his death was ruled an “accidental drowning,” his father and family maintain that the killing was the doing of local KKK members.
Bodies of three men lynched inGeorgia , May 1892



11. Jewish Community Center Murders – Overland Park, Kansas 2014
Former KKK leader Frazier Glenn Miller, Jr. murdered three people after opening fire at a local Jewish community center.

12. Stabbing Of Anti-KKK Protesters At Klan Rally – Anaheim, California 2016
Three people were stabbed by members and supporters of the KKK while protesting against their rally in California.

   Who killed Martin Luther King jnr.?
Who murdered the father of Malcom X.?
    The numbers keep rising, the bad news is they still exist till this day.

Here are some proof
Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

3/29

Charlottesville violence
KKK members, neo-Nazis and white nationalists went on the attack during the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, August 12, 2017. After clashes with anti-fascist protesters and police the rally was declared an unlawful gathering and disbanded.
Counter-protester Heather Heyer was killed and several others were injured when authorities said one of the white nationalist supporters rammed his car into the crowd.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

4/29
Charlottesville, Virginia
About 50 Ku Klux Klan members
marched on July 8, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia, after the city decided to take down a park statue of Confederate Army General Robert E. Lee.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images



6/29
A kkk member in an open demonstration 2017

Legal rally
The July 2017 rally in Charlottesville was authorized by officials in Virginia and more than 200 state and local police officers patrolled the scene. The city said 23 people were arrested.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

7/29

Backlash
Shouts of "racists go home" drowned out the handful of Klansmen chanting "white power," local reports said.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

8/29
In a secrete  gathering like this a prominent black man or woman sometimes even a poor helpless black or a Catholic priest or believer is murdered 

Swastika burnings
The KKK and other white supremacists gathered in Georgia to set a cross and Nazi swastika on fire while chanting, "white power," in August 2016.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Mike Stewart/AP

9/29
Kids
Klan members have a history of bringing children to rallies and other gatherings. Here, supporters get police protection at a July 2015 Confederate flag rally in Columbia, South Carolina.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: John Moore/Getty Images

10/29
Interviews with media
A member of the Ku Klux Klan, who says his name is Gary Munker, waves to reporters before an interview in Hampton Bays, New York, in November 2016.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: William Edwards/AFP/Getty Images

11/29
New members are been recruited every moment till this very hour.

New recruits?
Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: William Edwards/AFP/Getty Images

12/29
Cross burnings
Members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in cross burnings after a "white pride" rally near Cedar Town, Georgia, in April 2016.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: John Bazemore/AP

13/29

Ugly pamphlets
In August 2016, residents of Patchogue on Long Island, New York, also found KKK fliers in their community. This picture shows a flier
found in Southampton, N.Y. in 2014.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: WCBS-TV

14/29
Kkk members standing by the road side. Waiting for a black man I suppose 

Masks
Two masked Ku Klux Klansmen stand on a muddy dirt road during a December 2016 interview near Pelham, North Carolina.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On

16/29
Kkk and the racist Nazi logo tattoo on a white mans body. Open testimony 

"White pride"
A Ku Klux Klan member sporting swastika tattoos takes part in a Klan demonstration at the statehouse building in Columbia, South Carolina, in July 2015.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: John Moore/Getty Images

17/29
Protests
Ku Klux Klan members argue with counter-protesters at a Klan demonstration outside South Carolina's statehouse building in July 2015.
The KKK was protesting the removal of the Confederate flag from statehouse grounds and hurled racial slurs at minorities as law enforcement tried to prevent violence between opposing groups.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: John Moore/Getty Images

18/29
Demonstrations
Rallies in support of the Confederate flag were held in 26 states around the country.
Here, a member of the Ku Klux Klan gives a Nazi salute as the Klan members fly the Confederate flag during a demonstration at South Carolina's state capitol building in July 2015.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: John Moore/Getty Images

19/29
The kkk rally against Obama administration. This aint in the dark this is open

Anti-Obama rallies
Members of the Rosedale, Maryland, Klan rally against the Obama administration at the Maryland's Antietam National Battlefield in September 2013.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

20/29
Salutes
April Hanson and her husband, Harley Hanson, members of the International Keystone Knights Realm of Georgia, perform a traditional Klan salute along the highway in June 2012.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Curtis Compton/AP Photo

21/29
Rally in Kentucky
Neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members march against immigration at the state capitol in Frankfort, Kentucky in April 2012.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: John Flavell/AP

22/29
Marches
Members of the National Socialists Movement and the Klan march at the state capitol in Frankfort, Kentucky, in April 2012.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: AP

23/29
Cross burnings
Members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in cross burnings after a "White Pride" rally near Cedar Town, Georgia, in April 2016.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: John Bazemore/AP

24/29
Celebrating an early KKK member
Klan members participate in the 11th Annual Nathan Bedford Forrest birthday march in July 2009 in Pulaski, Tennessee.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

25/29

Beware spot the klan tattoo on his their ring finger. They are married to the agreement of black murder.

A Klan tattoo
A cross is seen on the hand of a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as he participates in the 11th annual Nathan Bedford Forrest birthday march in July 2009 in Pulaski, Tennessee.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

26/29

"White Unity Christmas"
Though the KKK and other white supremacist groups don't always agree, they sometimes hold events together.
Here, a man dressed as Santa gives a Nazi salute during a joint "White Unity Christmas Party" held by the American Nazi Party and the Klan in South Carolina in 2009.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Richard Ellis/Getty Images

27/29
Marches
A member of the Ku Klux Klan participates in the 11th annual Nathan Bedford Forrest birthday march in July 2009 in Pulaski, Tennessee.
Forrest was a lieutenant general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War and an early KKK member.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

28/29
Robes
A robed and masked Ku Klux Klansman stands on a dirt road during an interview near Pelham, North Carolina, in December 2016.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more on CBSN: On Assignment.
Credit: Jay Reeves/AP

29/29
David Duke
White nationalist and former KKK leader David Duke has praised Donald Trump, saying the Trump movement is an "insurgency that is waking up millions of Americans." Trump eventually disavowed him.
White supremacists have a new strategy to camouflage their rhetoric and enter the mainstream. Learn more


  

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